Genre Talk is a semiregular feature on The Novel Approach Reviews, the venue where

DSP Publications authors come to talk about their books, the evolution of stories, and pretty much anything.

 

Some are interviews, some are guest posts,

but all of them are a lesson in inspiration, genres, and the writing process.

 

*All links will open in a new offsite page.

 

 

 

Carole Cummings starts things off, for those who don't know what Genre Talk is about, with Introducing DSP Publications

 

 

Mark Wildyr tells us about writing diverse cultures, loving your publisher, and his Historical novel Cut Hand.

 

J. Scott Coatsworth dives into the speculative part of spec fic, the challenge of writing a large cast of characters, and the long and twisty path of bringing his Sci-fi novel The Stark Divide to publication.

 

Lina Langley contemplates genre mash, setting as an an entity of Story, and her Sci-fi/Paranormal release Welcome to Crash.

 

Xenia Melzer lets us tag along through the long, fascinating, and somewhat messy history of vampires in her dissection of The Subconscious Vampire.

 

Mark David Campbell talks about writing the human experience, swapping closets, and his Fantasy novel Eating the Moon.

 

Lloyd A. Meeker once again asks us to peer Through My Lens as he discusses story length in Size MattersHow Long Should a Story Be?

 

Ravon Silvius talks about emerging themes, the sometimes-mundanity from which Story sometimes springs, and their Fantasy release The Storm Lords.

 

Anne Barwell talks about the complexities of rewriting history, a love of research, and her Historical/Mystery & Suspense release Comes a Horseman.

 

Xenia Melzer tells us what she loves about writing spec fic, building a world without sexual bias, and her Fantasy release Ummana.

 

Elizabeth Noble dissects diversity and perceived norms, and the convenient rewriting of history when it comes to both in her essay entitled Going the Subtle Route.

 

In this installment of Through My Lens, we follow Lloyd A. Meeker as he deftly analyzes and explains The Problem of the Impossibly Broken Hero.

 

Bradley Lloyd talks about the appeal of "what if?" in speculative fiction, research research research, and his Sci-Fi release Shadow Fray.

 

Amy Rae Durreson tells us about defining diversity, switching genres, and her Fantasy release Recovery.

 

Amy Lane chats about writing female main characters in a m/m world, the importance of names, and her Fantasy/Paranormal release Quickening, Volume One.

 

J Tullos Hennig made the mistake of bringing Robyn and Gamelyn with her when she dropped by to talk about her Historical Fantasy release Summerwode. Marion tried to instill a bit of order, but....

 

Marguerite Labbe drops in to chat about the demon inside, how dragons can lead to real life love, and her Horror/Sci-fi novel, Pandora.

 

Andrew Q. Gordon did a three-part video interview series to promote the release of the fourth book in his Champion of the Gods series, Child of Night and Day.

Day One: BIG stories, diversity, and immersive worldbuilding

Day Two: nuance, “wasted” words, and in-depth characterization

Day Three: a virtual tour of Andy's writing space, plus some FAQs from the audience about his influences, defining priorities and finding time to write, as well as the evolution of Champion of the Gods

 

Don Travis talks about opinionated characters, the beauty of New Mexico, and his new Mystery & Suspense release, The Bisti Business.

 

Caleb James brings us a (rather disturbing!) guest post and his take on the man or woman in the mirror with Free Your Inner Child Killer.

 

Lloyd A. Meeker introduces his quarterly feature Through My Lens. This installment: Nuanced Villains and the Problem of Collateral Damage.

 

Adrian Randall steps aboard to talk about mashing genres, diversity in all its forms, and his Paranormal/Sci-fi thriller Countermind.

 

TJ Nichols imagines how magic might have changed the world, discusses different takes on diversity, and the Fantasy/Paranormal release Warlock in Training.

 

Rick R. Reed re-imagines classics, what it's like to have a furry "muse," and his Fantasy/Horror release, A Face Without a Heart.

 

Elizabeth Noble discusses mashing genres, the many ways of defining diversity, and her Mystery & Suspense/Paranormal release, Quarry.

 

Anne Barwell drops in to talk about diversity, writing the past, and her Historical/Mystery & Suspense release Winter Duet.

 

Kim Fielding chats about the joys of Powell's, what it's like to pet a Supreme Court Justice, and her Fantasy release Equipoise.

 

David C. Dawson tells us how stories somehow turn into series, The Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew, and his Mystery & Suspense novel The Necessary Deaths.

 

J.T. Rogers steals in to talk about spies, how research really pays, and her Historical/Mystery & Suspense novel In From the Cold.

 

A.J. Marcus emerges from the wilderness to tell us about the appeal of a series, bringing real life concerns into works of fiction, and his Mystery/Suspense novel Cougar Chaos.

 

Kim Fielding comes by to talk about the joys of AU, why diversity in fiction is so important, and her Fantasy novel Flux.

 

Mickie B. Ashling chats about historical fiction, drawing on experience for research, and her Historical novel Mayon.

 

August Li visits to talk about creating diverse cultures, the fun kind of research, and his High Fantasy release Calling and Cull.

 

C.S. Poe chats about why complexities are a good thing, the joys of research, and her Mystery/Suspense novel The Mystery of Nevermore, Snow & Winter: Book One.

 

A.M. Burns drops by to chat about breaking all the genre rules, grand adventures, and his Fantasy/Paranormal/SciFi novel Native Wind.

 

Elizabeth Noble gets a bit of a surprise, and her characters rather steal the show to talk about her Mystery/Suspense/Paranormal novel Code Name Jack Rabbit.

 

Christian Beck gives us an intriguing look at the world of spy-craft, in-depth characterization, and his Mystery/Suspense thriller The Last Enemy.

 

Anne Barwell talks WWII,  finding a balance between the real world and the worlds in one's head, and her Historical novel Shadowboxing.

 

John Inman discusses religion, his approach to writing, and his Spiritual novel, The Second Son.

 

Michael Rupured did a friendly takeover to tells us about some of his favorite authors, finding a place that fits, and his Historical Mystery/Suspense novel No Good Deed.

 

A.J. Marcus drops by to chat about the unexpected, how he defines diversity, and his Mystery/Suspense novel, Moose Fever.

 

Lex Chase tells us about being a survivor, going dark, and her High Fantasy novel, Chasing Sunrise

 

Lloyd A. Meeker takes the helm to explain why Magical Realism is not the same as Fantasy, and to talk about his newest book, Traveling Light.

 

Andrew Gordon talks about playing with the rules of societies, writing a series, and his High Epic Fantasy novel Kings of Lore and Legend.

 

Rick R. Reed tells us about the horrors of real life custody battles, the comfort and inspiration of a beloved pet, and his Mystery/Suspense novel Mute Witness.

 

Clare London takes a few moments to tell us about diversity in fiction, cheating at research, and the 2nd Edition release of her Fantasy novel Branded.

 

Caleb James brings all of his alter-egos to tell us about the many worlds of his writing, the classic Hero story, and his Fantasy Novel Haffling.

 

Amy Rae Durreson chats about Big Stories, diversity, and her Fantasy release Resistance

 

Lex Chase stops by via her blog tour to chat about superheroes, tropes, and her Fantasy novel Checkmate Ever After

 

B. A. Brock discusses Greek mythology, gaming, and his Fantasy novel King of the Storm

 

T.A. Venedicktov talks about co-authoring, growing up geek, and the SF book Chrysalis Corporation

 

 

Lissa Kasey discusses the impossible, fanfiction, and the Urban Fantasy/Paranormal novel Evolution: Genesis

 

 

J Tullos Hennig gives us a tutorial on the origins of the Romance genre, and how it relates to her Historical Fantasy Winterwode

 

 

Andrew Q. Gordon celebrates the release of his Paranormal thriller Purpose by getting a gaggle of authors to tell him what Paranormal means to them

 

 

Luchia Dertien tells us about dark fiction, unhinged relationships, and her Mystery-Thriller Gnomon

 

 

Rick R. Reed talks about genre restrictions, or the lack thereof, classics, and his Horror-Romance novel A Demon Inside

 

 

Deja Black drops by to discuss the m/m dynamic, organic evolution, and the Paranormal Mystery/Suspense novel Broken Bones

 

 

Patricia Correll tells us about Japanese mythology, shape-shifting, and her Fantasy novel Late Summer, Early Spring

 

 

Carole Cummings discusses Speculative Fiction, the value of big books, and the Fantasy/Steampunk novel Blue on Black

 

 

John Inman gives us his take on ghosts, haunted houses, and his Horror novel The Boys on the Mountain

 

 

Rick R. Reed gives us a creepy look at serial killers, anonymous hookups, and his Mystery/Suspense thriller IM

 

 

A.J. Marcus does a friendly takeover to talk about inspiration, bears, and his Mystery/Suspense novel Grizzly Discovery

 

 

Andrew Q. Gordon reminisces about Spec Fic classics, meaty plots, and the High Fantasy series Champion of the Gods

 

 

Andrea Speed tells us about the nature of a virus, alternative universes, and the Paranormal Mystery/Suspense novel Infected: Paris

 

 

Yeyu stops by to talk about Chinese mythology, the yaoi/BL genre, and her Historical Fantasy novel The Relics of Gods

 

 

John Inman visits to talk about scary inspiration, plane crashes, and his Horror novel Willow Man

 

 

A.J. Marcus chats about weather-as-inspiration, the wonders of nature, and his Mystery/Suspense novel Eagle's Blood

 

 

J Tullos Hennig talks about subverting paradigms, clashing theologies, and her Historical Fantasy novels Greenwode and Shirewode

 

 

 

 

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NOTE: We do not have a dedicated Twitter account, but announcements about posts and giveaways are tweeted regularly by Carole, who uses her account mostly for Genre Talk. If you'd like to follow her on Twitter to keep up on the Genre Talk posts, you're more than welcome. Just be aware that she's a bit of a Luddite not terribly proficient at it, and you may get the occasional bit of her own book promo mixed in when she remembers to do it.